Home Country: Seeds And Froth

first_imgHome CountryBy SLIM RANDLESDud and I had just about finished solving the problems on page one and were about to start solving sports dilemmas when Bert mumbled something. Now Bert, usually loquacious, was in one of his rare, but deadly, silent coffee mornings. Normally he’d fill the Mule Barn truck stop with his pronouncements on life, love, literature and the price of cauliflower, but not today.I took a sip and turned to Bert. “You say something, Bert?”“Seeds and froth,” he mumbled.“Seeds and froth?”“It’s not like it was my fault, you know. What did I do? Hey, sometimes seeds and froth just happen to people, and there’s no need to jump all over me about it.”Dud and I nodded as if we understood. We assumed more would be coming. It was.“I mean, is it a crime to own a mule? No. So I own a mule. So seeds and froth come along and the mule owner gets it? Where’s the justice in that? Ol’ Jack was hungry. Is that a crime now? And is it my fault? I don’t think so.”“How is ol’ Jack, anyway?” We all knew and loved the stove-up old retired mule that Bert took so much pride in.“He’s in the doghouse big time with Maizie,” Bert said. “Why shouldn’t she shoulder some responsibility for the seeds and froth? I mean, you could actually give her some of the blame for this mess, you know. She’s the one left the car window down.”“Do I have to hurt you, Bert?”“Huh? Oh, well, see, here’s what happened. Maizie did the shopping and drove in the yard, and you know how ol’ Jack likes to be loose and wander around the yard, right? So she took some groceries in the house, but not all of them, and Jack found the passenger window open and when she came back…”He put his head in his hands.“How was I supposed to know mules liked watermelon? You guys ever feed watermelon to a mule? Me neither. Who knew? By the time Maizie got back for her next load, ol’ Jack had eaten about two thirds of that watermelon on the seat. Man, there were seeds and froth all over the seat, the floor, the door and the mule. And I swear … I swear to you … he started grinning when he saw her coming back out of the house.”“And I guess you had to clean it up.”He nodded. “Dang mule has the table manners of a two year old. When you mix seeds and froth with mule slobber? Well … don’t do it.”Brought to you by Home Country (the book) at lpdpress.com.last_img read more

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People Moves: Colliers, Sheppard Robson, Lunson Mitchenall and more

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Student awarded £80,000 from Prince Albert’s educational legacy

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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ULVAC launches series of dry vacuum pumps

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Chambers of Commerce seek ‘fast-track’ employment claims

first_imgLow-value employment claims should be fast-tracked and dealt with through mediation, the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) recommended this week. Claims for less than £3,000 should be resolved within three months, the BCC said in a report on employment regulation. It claimed that employment cases are too costly and take an ‘unacceptable’ amount of time to reach tribunal, causing reputational damage to innocent companies. The BCC suggested a target time of 16 weeks for tribunal hearing dates to be set once claims are accepted. It said claimant employees who have not received legal advice should be vetted by an Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas) adviser, to ‘help deal with employees who make a claim with no legal basis, but who tie up the tribunal system and waste employers’ time and money’. Lewis Silkin employment partner Michael Burd said that the recommendations for stamping out serial litigants were sensible, but shortening the average time to hearing would be costly.last_img read more

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A city of a million small sites

first_imgAnother week and another argument rages over the UK’s housing crisis and the growing isolation of urban communities.Yet over the water in Berlin and Brussels, locals can point to attractive reimaginings of their cities, where appealing (and cheaper) self-build neighbourhoods and waterfront homes rub shoulders with larger-scale developments. What do these cities know that London doesn’t?In recent years, our cities have seemed overwhelmed by globalisation and its demands on services, followed by the ravages of austerity. UK local government in particular seems wedded to top-down notions of regeneration – outsourcing the problem to big developers to tackle it at scale. The results? Cookie-cutter approaches, ghost towns and developers walking away from brownfield sites that don’t fit the plan for bigness.Our leaders have forgotten that housing can be reduced to the smallest units of delivery – a single street, terrace or building. Communities were built this way over generations and people will build again if conditions are put in place – common networks, boundaries and catalysts. These factors not only promote a sense of place and vibrancy, they also enable sustainable growth and change.But European cities haven’t forgotten the lessons: they’re mixing top-down and bottom-up approaches to renewal. Look at Berlin’s Self Made City or development in Hamburg, successfully involving many different stakeholders and self-builders.Our leaders have forgotten that housing can be reduced to the smallest units of delivery – a single street, terrace or buildingIn these cases, councils mediate between stakeholders, fixing site infrastructure and design principles and reducing building risk. These authorities offer land for smaller developers and self-builders as well as the big boys. As the attractive facades of the Hamburg waterside or Berlin’s Self Made City attest, this hub approach offers wider building uses and greater flexibility as communities grow – things that identikit housing programmes cannot deliver.Of course, people acting alone will always struggle to deliver housing. We need to redefine the private sector (starting with development models) to include the whole market, not just the big players. The government always sees the solution as being engaging with the big housebuilders and not the small ones. We need to open the market to wider opportunities and make it work equitably for the individual, the collective and the corporate.But the penny is dropping over here. Council chiefs are again warming to the idea of being regional growth enablers. The coalition’s enthusiasm for new approaches such as self-build may have been short lived but it inspired projects such as the mayor of London’s Popular Home initiative for common building patterns (although it’s still looking for the act of will to be tried and tested) and the new Build Your Own London Home Register, which together explore common approaches to housebuilding and identify locations for self-build housebuilding.In addition, Community Right to Build – which gives communities a right through a local referendum to determine local schemes without resorting to the planning process – is an inspired move but it is also struggling to emerge as a credible solution, faced with resistance from many in the planning profession. Many planners are not aware of the Community Right to Build and some others see it as an affront to their professionalism.There is a lot of interest throughout town hall corridors in arm’s length management companies or organisations (ALMO), not-for-profit bodies that are set up by local authorities to manage and improve all or part of their housing stock on their behalf. ALMOs have the potential to renew communities with bottom up and co-production methods – and deal with brownfield sites where developers won’t tread.Builders and councils are familiar with legendary city planner David Crane’s call for “a city of a thousand designers”. The challenge now is to provide opportunities for a city of a hundred-thousand builders. The London Popular Home Initiative’s report to the GLA recognised that there were over 1,500 vacant or under-used sites (mainly smaller ones – aside of the big GLA-owned locations) in public ownership across London that could provide new affordable and private homes – and support wider social and economic development. The mayor’s team is already putting together a register of such sites.City dwellers admire urban and neighbourhood regeneration projects but often struggle to share the best examples, or make use of common ideas and tools, to make sustainable change happen at scale. In reality we need both top-down and bottom-up to be working together. This is still not happening as well as it should.It’s time for a city of a million small sites, where we encourage and incentivise building innovation and smallness. Rather than always thinking big to achieve change, we should think of allowing small changes – delivered on a massive scale.Kelvin Campbell is curator of the Smart Urbanism Network and Massive Small, a campaign to build an online compendium of “bottom-up” change project knowledge and references through Kickstarter fundinglast_img read more

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Sennebogen gives ASCO a lift

first_imgThe Sennebogen 6130 mobile harbour crane has a maximum lifting capacity of 84 tonnes and a hook height of 49 m, with a working radius of 45 m.ASCO’s site in Peterhead is prone to high winds and is quite exposed so the new Sennebogen cranes, which can operate in winds of up to 20 m per second, have given the company better operational flexibility, says operations manager, Duncan Bell.”The cranes are a lot quicker to move from berth to berth and their manoeuvrability means that we don’t have to clear the quay. They can turn in a far smaller radius,” added Raymond Stephen, ASCO’s cargo operations supervisor.Sennebogen’s area sales manager, Christian Strasser, also commented on the investement: “With this project, we worked with Sennebogen UK and Eire dealer, E H Hassell & Sons Ltd and Duncan Bell and his team at ASCO in Peterhead to ensure we supplied the correct machine for this very demanding application.”  www.sennebogen.comwww.ascoworld.comlast_img read more

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Blue Water navigates Russian waterways

first_imgHansa Heavy Lift vessel HHL Lagos was loaded with four upper and four lower columns and bracings in Singapore, before being shipped to Georgia, where the cargo was unloaded at the port of Batumi.Florian Pinz, project manager at Blue Water Singapore, explained that the cargo was then loaded onto chartered barges, for delivery through the Russian river system and into the Caspian Sea.”Some of the columns weighed up to 400 tonnes, and were over 11 m high,” added Pinz.The project involved Blue Water’s offices in Singapore, Denmark, Georgia and Azerbaijan.”It is extremely important that you have local expertise in your team, when heavy items are passing through a narrow river,” said Pinz.  www.bws.dklast_img

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Jennifer Coolidge launches American Pie NOW TV pop-up in London

first_imgStifler’s Mom aka actress Jennifer Coolidge has launched a NOW TV pop-up pie shop experience in London’s Soho to mark the 20th anniversary of the comedy classic American Pie.Open for one day only (Tuesday 30th July), fans can stop by and pick up a free warm apple pie with a ready-made cheeky hole in the middle. Every pie comes from a free NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass.Credit: NOW TVJennifer Coolidge said: “It’s such an honour to have been invited here for such a celebratory moment for the film – 20 years on and I know Stifler’s Mom would have loved to have been a part of that classic film moment. Now I’m here, I get to give the fans exactly what they want – a piece of delicious apple pie at NOW TV’s pop-up.”To add to the celebrations, new customers can get a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass for just £4.99 – the same price you would have paid for a cinema ticket in 1999. Available from Tuesday 30th July to Sunday 4th August 2019 via the NOW TV American Pie website: www.nowtv.com/pies.The pop-up is open from 12pm to 6pm at 48 Poland Street, Soho, London, W1F 7ND and is free. The nearest tube is Oxford Circus.Enjoy American Pie and over 1,000 movies on demand with a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass. Sign up for a free trial now.last_img read more

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Gains made in DR Congo Ebola fight, but challenges persist –…

first_imgDR Congo to deploy second Ebola vaccine A United Nations peacekeeper has his shoes cleaned before leaving an Ebola treatment centre in Mangina, North Kivu province, on September 1, 2019./ Getty ImagesThe Democratic Republic of Congo continues to make noteworthy gains in the fight against Ebola, though the health agencies face a challenge reaching militant infested regions and refugees fleeing clashes in the country, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.There were only 14 confirmed cases in the past week, the lowest figure in a year and a drop from 51 in mid-September, and 126 in April – the peak of the outbreak.“The fact that it is a smaller area is positive but the disease has also moved into more rural and more insecure areas,” Dr Michael Ryan, executive director of WHO’s health emergencies programme, said upon on his return from a trip to Congo.“The virus is essentially back where it began,” he said.The current Ebola outbreak in the DR Congo has killed more than 2,100 people since August last year, and is considered the country’s largest ever outbreak.The World Health Organization reports that some 1,000 people have recovered from the disease, with more than 3,150 cases overall.The agency in July declared the Ebola outbreak a public health emergency of international concern, calling for more measures to curb its spread.Dr Ryan said the outbreak was confined to a geographic triangle stretching between the towns of Mambasa, Komanda, Oicha and Mandima, though it was still spreading at a low level.“We are really reaching a point where we are more and more on top of things, more and more on top of surveillance, more and more on top of infection prevention and control,” Ryan said. “The problem is it’s back in areas that are deeply insecure,” he said.Congolese health authorities said last month that they plan to introduce a second Ebola vaccine, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson, to complement another single-dose vaccine made by Merck, but no date has been announced.Related Uganda seeks joint operations with DR Congo in Ebola fightcenter_img DR Congo Massacrelast_img read more

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