Sheffield ski resort marks debut for £1bn regeneration fund

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Terrence Hahn Officially Joins Axalta As CEO

first_img“My career experiences – at Honeywell and Air Products and living in Asia, Europe and the Americas – have built my passion for delivering value to stakeholders every day,” said Hahn. “Innovative offerings, exceptional customer service and efficient operations from an extraordinarily talented team will continue to be hallmarks of Axalta as we drive both organic and inorganic growth.  I am excited about the bright and bold future ahead of us.”Shaver added, “The board and I are very confident in Terrence’s expertise and welcome him as Axalta’s next CEO. It was my honor and privilege to serve as Axalta’s CEO for more than five years. As Chairman, I look forward to working with Terrence as he takes over as CEO of Axalta.”Hahn is an entrepreneurial leader with a track record of developing differentiated strategies for global deployment, having most recently served as president and CEO of Honeywell’s Home and Building Technologies business group. Before assuming that role, he served as president and CEO of Honeywell Transportation Systems in Switzerland, where he led a rapid global expansion of the business group. Hahn has served in various other executive leadership roles at Honeywell since joining in 2007.AdvertisementPrior to his time at Honeywell, he spent nearly 20 years with Air Products in a range of business, operations and technology leadership roles, with positions based in Taiwan, Malaysia and Canada. He currently serves on the board of directors at Regal Beloit Corp. He holds an MBA degree from the Wharton School of Business at The University of Pennsylvania and master and bachelor degrees in materials science and engineering from Lehigh University. Axalta Coating Systems announced that Terrence Hahn has officially joined the company as CEO, succeeding Charlie Shaver, who will continue at Axalta as Non-Executive Chairman. Hahn also serve on Axalta’s board of directors, expanding the board’s size from eight to nine directors.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementAxalta previously announced this transition on July 25, 2018.last_img read more

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DeepOcean Secures IMR Contract with Petrobras Offshore Brazil

first_imgDeepOcean AS, part of DeepOcean Group, announced that together with its Brazilian partner Comphania Brasileira de Offshore (CBO) they have been awarded a 2 year with 2 year options contract from Petróleo Brasileiro S/A (“PETROBRAS”) E&P Services.The contract includes subsea inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) work on PETROBRAS’s subsea installations in Brazilian waters. DeepOcean will use the MV CBO Isabella, a multipurpose offshore subsea support vessel, for the contract. MV CBO Isabella will be equipped with 1 WROV and 1 OBSROV as well as various subsea tooling.The work will be managed by DeepOcean’s Brazilian organisation and executed by a team of ROV operators, survey personnel and offshore management. Offshore operations are due to commence mid September 2013.President of DeepOcean AS, Mads Bardsen, is excited to win the work for PETROBRAS:“This contract award demonstrates that our customers value our high quality subsea services, and prove our company’s competitive performance in deep water operations”. “DeepOcean has the unique deep water experience and the expertise needed for Brazilian subsea operations. 90 per cent of PETROBRAS’s reserves are nestled in deep water which is our speciality. In 2007, DeepOcean was awarded its first long-term subsea services contract by PETROBRAS. In 2012 we won a two-year contract with the flexible repair vessel Deep Endeavour. With the award of this second long term contract with the MV CBO Isabella for PETROBRAS in Brazil, we are well-positioned to further develop our strong position in this region,” Mr Bardsen continues.Press Release, September 16, 2013last_img read more

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Wind farm support vessels: The lifeblood of a wind farm

first_imgThere are some blunt facts about wind farm support vessels and some of them do not make pleasant reading. In the past four years there have been many wind farm support vessels built, some for existing companies and some for new companies. At the time they were ordered the prospects looked good with the UK Round 3 projects that were announced in January 2010 in sight. For many owners and operators of these new vessels it must now appear that the prospects for full time employment in 201U are not as good as was earlier expected.The operation & maintenance (O&M) work on the existing Round 2 and 2A wind farms continues, and will remain buoyant until the start of the Round 3 projects providing work for good proportion of the wind farm support vessels.The huge Round 3 wind farm projects will be built in phases providing long term employment for men and machinery. However, there have been delays in the kick off of Round 3 projects and for some of the wind farm support vessels there will not be enough work in the meantime.There are many reasons why these projects have not followed on so quickly leaving the industry in the situation in which it finds itself today. It is not surprising that wind farm projects that are many times larger than anything done before take longer to plan. Coupled with this there has been a sustained financial crisis that has hit this sustainable energy program really hard.Today we have to look hard to see whether there is a light, however small, appearing at the end of this tunnel. We cannot see into the future and we give no guarantee that the projects will start on a particular date, or indeed that they will start at all, but the recent news from Siemens and Green Port Hull that they are doubling their plans for investment in the region, to the amount of £310 million, has lit a green light which is shining at the end of the tunnel.When the physical work on the Round 3 projects does finally start, when men and machines are required for the construction and installation work, there will not even be enough of these vessels in the water and there may not be enough experienced men to sail on board them.The importance of WFSVsThe support vessels provide the life blood and the pulse during all of the stages of a wind farm. They are the veins that carry the passengers to keep the wind farm in operation. If these veins are damaged or the blood is sick then the whole infrastructure can fail. Keeping the vessels operating in a safe and efficient manner, while also looking at keeping the costs down, is of great importance to the whole survival of the industry.The passengers are sometimes reluctant to enthuse over this form of commuting especially when the sea state is described as ‘marginal’, but the work must be done. There is a wide range of vessels available from which the operators may choose, so what are the operators of the support vessels looking for now and in the future that will provide a healthy and strong flow for this life blood?Offshore WIND asked some owners/ operators of wind farm support vessels what they are feeling at this moment in time what the captains of this industry are concerned about for the current and future prospects of these purpose built support vessels.A2SEA A/SHans Schneider, the COO of A2SEA, the Danish owner of both installation and support vessels, stated that the sector has matured. This aging has changed transfer of personnel in the offshore wind industry; it has now become a real business requiring real shipping companies.With real shipping companies running these vessels he does not see any future restrictions in the size of the operational fleets that they can manage. It will be a client led growth however, with the client determining whether they remain with a single company that would grow to meet the required size or divide the vessel requirements among several owners.A2SEA operates a varied fleet including 4 SWATH vessels on bare boat charter, built to carry up to 24 passengers. The company also has full management responsibility for six mono hull vessels for DONG Energy including two vessels for 24 passengers and a catamaran for 12 passengers.This has become a shipping company operation that is operated by managers with shipping company experience. The larger vessels are classed as passenger vessels and must follow all the regulations for this classification such as being fitted with data recorders for communications, engine instructions, etc. This information is required as evidence should an accident occur. Recording it on the smaller vessels for up to 12 passengers is not compulsory.The company has already made the move and gained the experience in a field where other companies are still left wondering whether or not to take the step into larger vessels, licensed to carry more than 12 passengers.It is not only the size of the vessels that determines the different limitations. Mr Schneider makes his differentiation also between the vessels working in the construction and installation phases and those employed for O&M work.Although they are not always required to use the extra passenger facility their clients have this useful extra option for crew transfer, which is especially useful during the services provided in the early phases of the wind farm’s life. Teams of eight engineers and technicians, for example, can be delivered to carry out installation work on two or three turbines in the same wind farm.An O&M team is considerably smaller. As far as deck cargo is concerned their vessels have no special demands placed on them by their clients. If the vessel would change from a fast crew transfer vessel to become a freight vessel then either performance would be reduced or costs increased in an attempt to maintain performance.It is all very well to be able to carry a gearbox on the fore deck, for example, but what do you do with it at the turbine? A sufficiently large crane would still be needed to lift it to the nacelle, so let the crane vessel take whatever is needed to the turbine.For the wind farms being built further away from the coast in the future we asked Mr Schneider whether his vessels would be employed as they are today.His response, referring again to the installation phase, was that there are wind farms already using accommodation vessels and he thinks that the use of these units will be increasingly common in the future, with his vessels carrying the teams inter-field from these units to the turbines. Helicopters could well be used later for O&M operations, depending on where the base port is for the wind farm, but the fast 12 passenger vessels will still be in use.When asked for his opinion on fitting access systems to his vessels, he explains that the maximum sea state which allows the passengers to travel in comfort is already being reached. Fitting extra equipment on board to allow them to transfer from ship to turbine transition piece in heavier weather conditions would not necessarily be worthwhile if the persons concerned were so fatigued by sea sickness that they would be unsafe or unable to work after the transfer. The transfer systems, however, do possess certain advantages and some clients would prefer take advantage of these, so of course if the client requires a unit to be fitted then it could be done.Their vessels are fitted with fender surveillance systems to monitor the pressure on the fenders when sticking to the transition piece. The information is used to show the specific conditions being available for safe transfers and also to monitor longer-term wear and tear of the fenders. All conditions during a voyage are recorded on an open monitoring system which is used in the daily progress reports. This information has been shown to be useful for many purposes such as crew training for example.CWind LtdCWind have a completely different approach to wind farm support vessel management. Until recently CWind have only had one type of vessel in their fleet, but earlier this year the new CTruk SWATH vessel was added to their fleet. All their other vessels are the 20T built by CTruk. The 20T is a resin infusion composite construction catamaran vessel with modular topsides which enable the 12 seat passenger area to be lifted off and when the wheel house is moved aft provides a large fore deck area for freight. Because their vessels are mostly similar they are able to offer packages to charter clients with the vessels having the same common pedigree and common capabilities. Peter Jorgensen is the Managing Director of this multi-faceted company that also supplies technicians and engineers for installation and O&M work, as well as offshore training services. Offshore WIND asked him whether they would be ordering a different class of vessel in the future, one perhaps with more than 12 passengers. The answer was perhaps a little cagey but it would appear that they are looking at developing a larger version of the 20T vessel in cooperation with CTruk in the future. So other vessel types are a possibility in the future.Many of their vessels are in their ‘boat-share’ scheme. These vessels have a part-owner who sails as skipper but has also invested in the boat and shares the costs and profits with CWind. The feature of this concept that they sail as skipper will become a little difficult now as most of these skippers have ordered a second boat.The ability to convert their vessels into freight carriers within a few hours makes questions about the cargo handling slightly redundant. Safety is obviously their prime objective, but the fact that their vessels are so versatile and when coupled to providing passenger comfort with speed and an economical fuel consumption rate gives their fleet a huge advantage.In the future CWind may look at possibilities with access systems and sleeping accommodation, the latter would be more appropriate on the proposed larger vessel, but these, and other developments will be client led, possibly when working further out at sea with longer deployments.Other technical ‘add on’ systems already in their pipeline include developing protocols and processes that will provide CWind with accurate, up-to-date and comprehensive operational data to the benefit of the crew, operator and charterer alike.Although CWind and CTruk are keen to point out that they are separate entities, this combination of operator and builder is almost unique and has many advantages. For example, operational feedback is more easily available for design improvements.Turn-key operations, where their client asks for a complete technical services agreement including logistics, are becoming more common now. For example, they can offer a single contract to carry out the turbine maintenance which includes getting the engineers and technicians to the offshore installation. Mr Jorgensen says: “These are exciting times at CWind, as more and more companies are interested in our brand of complete solutions. Increasingly we are deploying our vessels as part of a comprehensive solution that covers construction tasks or O&M packages as well as the crew transport. If a package manager can take on the vessels needed together with the technician teams he requires – that is a ready-made solution.”MPI WorkboatsMPI Workboats have 14 vessels working, 2 of them built by the PIRIOU Group’s South East Asia Shipyard and 12 by South Boats. The fleet consists of three 15m, four 17m, one 20m, and four 19m South Boats built vessels and, from Vietnam, the two 21.85m vessels which were designed by BMT/Nigel Gee. This is already a large operation, but they do see room for a larger fleet with a possible 20 vessels working in the future.Safety is again the obvious priority issue but high on their list of other important factors is the comfort of their passengers and the performance of their vessels especially in the harsher environments that will be experienced in the more distant wind farms of the future.It is the longer travel time in these harsh conditions that they see as being the greatest challenge to come. For the latest generation, the four 19m South Boats vessels that are being delivered, MPI had stated that high performance, reduced fuel consumption and higher levels of passenger comfort were all required criteria.Leslie Robertson, the General Manager at MPI Workboats, questions how many (extra) days will become available if transfer systems were placed routinely on-board support vessels? When the cost of the unit per day is compared to the day rate of a vessel, would it really make sense?Whether their clients have an accommodation vessel or other mobile accommodation units on the future large projects further offshore, Ms Robertson sees that the pattern of support vessel usage and crew transfer operation in conjunction with the accommodation at the wind farm still requires formulating. It will not only be vessels for inter-field transfer but also for the long haul trips from the base port to the site that will need direction and purpose before a workable solution is found.Limits and opportunities for the futureThe wind farm support vessels have created a new maritime sector in recent years. There is a trend in the new builds for larger vessels. Not always for larger cargo capacity and rarely for a larger number of passengers, just larger vessels which are more able to ride comfortably in harsher weather conditions. Different designs, such as the SWATH from CTruk, provide a less stressful commute for the technicians and engineers. It remains to be seen whether the use of access systems will be limited to the really large vessels with, for example, 60 passengers.Are the 12 people sitting behind the crew called passengers or what else can you call them? Today most of these vessels are limited to 12 passengers; will we see a change of the regulations, or definition, in the future brought on by a requirement for more passenger transfers to the wind farms further out to sea?With the greater distances the passenger comfort becomes more of a necessity rather than just a requirement as also are the on-board facilities available, such as TV and WiFi to relieve the boredom of a 3 hour journey.Sleeping accommodation for the passengers, however, does not appear to be a major issue. It looks as though it will provide a slight advantage further offshore but primarily for the crew of the support vessel to use.The smaller vessels, under 17m, will find it difficult to find work in the more distant projects, but remain active in the near shore wind farms.It is not going to be an easy time in the months to come for some of the companies providing offshore wind farm support. The companies with no alternative options away from the offshore wind industry will struggle.However their purpose built vessels will remain fit for purpose for a long time, and the experience their owners and crew have gained up to the present time will serve them well in the future, and there is a future with good prospects ahead. The light at the end of this tunnel has been lit.Dick Hilllast_img read more

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House sales drop a third as credit crunch bites

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Amateur dramatics

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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BigMove expands fleet

first_imgThe vehicles, according to BigMove, have been designed to support the construction industry and can transport loads up to 105 tonnes. They can be deployed with a variety of axle combinations and feature a hollow rear trailer unit, which BigMove said can be used for the transportation of additional cargo, such as digger/crane arms.A partially modular platform body with dolly trailer enables the use of three and four-axle trucks. The net weight of each vehicle is 41.8 tonnes.“The vehicles are easy to operate and can be used flexibly within the BigMove network. As a result, we can meet even the most exacting demands in terms of heavy goods haulage,” said Olaf Beckedorf, ceo of BigMove. “The vehicles can easily be used interchangeably within the network – without us having to apply for any extra permits, as would usually otherwise be the case.”In order to strengthen its network further, BigMove said it plans to focus its investments on semi-trailers and extendible trailers.www.bigmove.netlast_img read more

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23 new boilers and 15 roofs: HMCTS insists it is fixing weather-beaten courts

first_imgThe head of the courts service has promised that action is being taken to maintain the estate as it struggles to counter recent bad weather.This month has seen reports of cells closed for being too cold at Snaresbrook Crown Court, lifts out of order at Maidstone Crown Court and heating systems breaking at Isleworth Crown Court.Many of the breakdowns were fixed quickly, but the problems have prompted HM Courts & Tribunals Service chief executive Susan Acland-Hood to make a public pledge that issues are being addressed across the estate.Writing in her regular blog, Acland-Hood said HMCTS is doing everything it can with the resources available to make short-term and longer lasting changes. She acknowledged the recent snow and freezing temperatures had created extra challenges and put existing ones into sharp relief, but insisted work is happening to improve the situation.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# Susan Acland-HoodAcland-Hood revealed that the capital maintenance budget, set at around £35m a year, is currently being spent on projects to replace 23 boilers, 15 roofs and 33 lifts, with more work planned for next year.A one-off £5m fund, which must be spent by the end of this month, is also helping toward small ‘fixes’ designed to help everyday lift in courts and tribunals. The fund is paying for 300 projects at nearly 250 sites, ranging from new carpets and chairs in waiting rooms to refurbished receptions, plastering and painting, and mending broken fixtures and fittings.Acland-Hood said: ‘We are also investing in a comprehensive survey of the estate that will allow us to do more and better planned and proactive maintenance, so that we have fewer problems arising that need fixing. We’ll still have to make some hard choices about resources; but I am confident that the combination of ongoing maintenance, quick fixes, dedicated local teams and a cohesive longer-term estates strategy will make steady and incremental improvements to our courts and tribunals.’last_img read more

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Russians reaffirm faith in rail

first_imgAddressing the ’Congress of Transport on the Threshold of the New Century’ in Moscow on December 6, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin went to some trouble to assure delegates that the national rail network ’is and will remain the backbone of Russia’s transport system’. He told them that to prevent any situation where transport problems could retard economic development ’we have made adjustments to national policy’.Putin stressed the need for investment to modernise the network and its equipment, warning that ’the transport system of the country is catastrophically ageing … we still use the equipment and the technology from Soviet times.’ On some routes passengers ’spend four times longer than in Europe or Japan’ for journeys of the same length.Noting that domestic industry was developing modern electric locomotives, long distance and commuter coaches, he said that the government would be monitoring progress on the implementation of the different state programmes. At the congress, First Deputy Prime Minister & Railways Minister Nikolai Aksyonenko reported that the volume of freight and passenger traffic was rising again, with 12 and 8% increases respectively over the first 10 months of the year compared with 1998.last_img read more

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Full order book in Freilassing

first_imgROBEL: Driven by a robust export market and sub-contracted work from its parent company Plasser & Theurer, German track equipment supplier Robel is increasing capacity at its base in the south of the country.,Like its partner company Plasser & Theurer, German supplier Robel is in the happy position of enjoying a full order book, much of which is destined for the export market. So busy is the company that it is about to double its production capacity, having previously expanded its factory to raise capacity in 2003-04.Currently in the assembly shops at Freilassing are the first two of eight Type 57.44 self-propelled overhead line maintenance and inspection vehicles. The first was due to undergo a three-month programme of acceptance trials from March, and the second was due to be sent to Münster for display at iaf 2009. The customer is a large national operator in Europe with an extensive electrified network.The 57.44 is a four-axle vehicle with two cabs and the ability to run at 140 km/h thanks to two 480 kW diesel engines driving through hydrodynamic transmissions; hydrostatic transmission is used when the machine is in work mode. During braking, the 24·9 m long vehicle makes use of hydraulic retarders that are blended with mechanical disc brakes.The cab has a driver-machine interface developed in co-operation with the customer, and the vehicle has been prepared for operations using ETCS. Instead of using folding side mirrors, the driver views the side of the machine through four cameras mounted over the doors, while a fifth camera can be used to monitor the pantograph.Two roof-mounted working platforms allow access to overhead wires and other structures, one platform having a vertical reach of 26 m and the ability to reach up to 9 m below the track, meaning that the vehicle could be used for viaduct inspections or repairs.Robel is also producing 22 Type 40.44 rail loading trains for Swiss Federal Railways. All but two consist of pairs of flat wagons fitted with lateral cranes for lifting sections of rail up to 36 m long rail on and off the vehicles. The other two are six-wagon sets able to handle 120 m long rails.Also due to be delivered shortly from Freilassing are two pairs of multi-purpose Type 54.17 works vehicles destined for urban operators in Germany, one of which will be on the display tracks in Münster. Each vehicle has a Deutz engine with particle filter for operation in tunnels; this powers the vehicle through a hydrostatic drive. The 90 kW rating is powerful enough for a pair of the vehicles operating in multiple to haul a U-Bahn trainset up a grade of 5%; radio remote control is fitted.Robel is well known for its wide range of small machines such as power wrenches and drills, and small machines make up around 50% of the company’s workload. Unveiled at InnoTrans last September was an updated version of its classic 30.82 universal power wrench which is intended for use with track featuring bolt fastenings. More than 7 000 of these 30.82 units have been produced to date, and Robel hopes that the updated version will prove equally popular. The machine to be shown at Münster has an electric coupling and a digital display that enables precise setting of torque. Adjustments have been made to the handle design to improve the ergonomics, and Robel used a designer to enhance the machine’s appeal and improve handling comfort. Other changes include better lighting so that both left and right hand rails are illuminated without shadow. The design has been tested with 20 customers in Germany, Austria and Switzerland over 18 months, the supplier says.Because of the shortage of capacity at Plasser’s Linz works, Robel is assembling a number of large machines under contract; these include a RPM ballast cleaner for German contractor Schweerbau. Robel also builds machines such as the SSP ballast plough as an independent supplier. The company also conducts its own research and development work and is currently working on several projects with Austrian Federal Railways.Facilities available at Freilassing include a test track laid with different cants and irregular alignment to put tampers and liners through their paces both for demonstration and approvals processes. A second test track features different types of sleeper and fastenings.last_img read more

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