QuadraTherm® meters gain approvals

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Alstom’s hydrogen train wins award

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Solicitor concerns over plans to scrap ARP

first_imgSolicitors have voiced concerns over ‘knee-jerk’ proposals to abolish the assigned risks pool (ARP) next year in their responses to a Solicitors Regulation Authority consultation on the issue. The Law Society said it did not support the SRA’s plan to scrap the pool, which it said provides ‘an important safety net to firms disadvantaged by the hardening insurance market – with a significant number able to return to the open market after a short period of cover by the ARP’. The ARP provides professional indemnity insurance to firms that cannot find cover on the open market, and charges high premiums of up to 27.5% of gross fees. The SRA launched a consultation on abolishing the pool in November. Law Society president Robert Heslett said: ‘The ARP is an integral element of client protection… and its existence is consistent with the principle established by council that the regulator, not the [insurance] market, should determine whether a firm should stay in practice.’ He added: ‘The Law Society would also like to see changes to the successor practice rules to enable more firms to merge or be acquired, and an overarching approach to closure which doesn’t bankrupt solicitors.’ Heslett said any changes to the ARP should only flow from a ‘holistic review’ of the indemnity system, adding that the Society did support the SRA’s proposals to prevent start-ups from entering the ARP, subject to a full impact assessment and 12-month transition period. ‘We believe that current requirements to open a practice are too lax, and this initiative may encourage better business planning in order to demonstrate that a firm represents a good risk,’ he said. The Law Society also supports a reduction in the maximum period a firm can spend in the ARP. The Sole Practitioners Group (SPG) warned that scrapping the ARP would be a ‘knee-jerk reaction’ to the ‘unprecedented’ economic situation facing high street conveyancing firms at the last renewal. Janis Purdy, chairwoman of the SPG’s indemnity committee, said: ‘Closing the ARP would cause panic in the market, but not eradicate bad firms. They will continue, even uncertificated and uninsured, and effectively underground.’ Purdy added that the management of ARP firms should be ‘rigorous’, with the SRA visiting and assessing them all ‘in the first month’. Cordella Bart-Stewart, chairwoman of the Black Solicitors Network, said it was the wrong time to scrap the ARP when accusations that some ethnic minority solicitors had been the subject of discrimination by insurers had still not been resolved. She added that there were indications that ethnic minority solicitors would be disproportionately affected by the ARP closure.last_img read more

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If you want my advice …

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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DB Schenker opens new branch offce in Mongolia

first_imgThe branch is also the first to be opened by Schenker China Ltd in the Inner Mongolia province. The company stated that it had opened the branch office “in order to extend business coverage, develop new business and stretch its presence in the north of China”. Hohhot’s key industries are woollen textiles, food, pharmaceuticals, wind power, coal, machine tools and fibre optic cable. DB Schenker says it has offices and facilities in 57 cities throughout China with more than 4,600 employees in the country.www.dbschenker.comlast_img

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Allcargo projects head steps down

first_imgIt is still unclear who will take over from Kalyaniwalla at Allcargo.Meanwhile, the Indian company has appointed Adarsh Hedge as joint managing director for a period of five years, with effect from July 1.www.allcargologistics.comlast_img

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Releasing trauma through exercise

first_imgMembers of the Bonteheuwel Walking Ladies took part in trauma release exercises (known as TRE). A medical doctor frustrated with medicine’s lack of dealing with trauma and stress effectively, has introduced trauma release exercises, known as TRE.Dr Melanie Salmon returned to South Africa seven years ago, after working in the United Kingdom for 30 years. It was there that she met Dr David Berceli, an American doctor, and the founder of TRE. Dr Berceli worked in Lebanon for eight years, and here he had to deal with many people going through traumatic circumstances.Dr Salmon said: “He found that when people are traumatised, they would shake, but not fully. He then studied animals, and discovered that animals in the wild, when going through a traumatic event, would shake so much, that they would tremor. After this tremor, he found that the animals will be without stress or anxiety. That’s when he developed the exercises to help people’s bodies shake naturally. It is safe, and through this exercise, years of stress can be released. I was very interested in this, because I know stress and illnesses are connected. It takes three months to recalibrate stress, and people can get their health back on track.”Her explanation for why people are diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer, for example, is because of all the years of built-up stress. It signifies the end stage of a stressful life, she said. Doing these exercises can be preventative but it can also benefit those already diagnosed, for the condition not to get worse.Dr Salmon was introduced to the Bonteheuwel Walking Ladies, and because of their initiatives to work towards a safer Bonteheuwel, Dr Salmon thought it would be ideal to teach the members of this club the exercises. “These are simple exercises, and it helps with emotional and physical challenges. It’s easy to teach also, as one does not need to know the culture or even the language of the person you are teaching it to.“We are working with the Bonteheuwel Walking Ladies for six weeks – teaching them how to do the exercise. We wanted to work with Bonteheuwel, because we want to break the cycle if violence. I believe violence is perpetrated because people are so stressed out. With TRE, it reduces the level of tension, and a person practising it, would, rather than lash out, behave in a non-violent way. This exercise is deep relaxation, and reaches the psoas muscle, which can’t be reached with massaging, as it is situated behind one’s organs. The idea is that once the ladies are trained, then they will pass on this skill to others in the community. The effects of this exercise is immediate, and the balancing of the nervous system takes about three months of exercise. I have been working with schools on the Cape Flats for three years now, and this exercise has proven to, in some cases, cure Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and bed wetting,” Dr Salmon said.Chairperson of the Bonteheuwel Walking Ladies, Soraya Salie, said she feels “lighter from within”, since starting this exercise programme.“We carry so much weight around with us, because of trauma. Apart from the physical and emotional benefits of TRE, we also find it to be educational. One of the things I have learnt is that the body remembers all the trauma it experiences – from the foetal stage up until your current age. We are very excited also that the Bonteheuwel Walking Ladies will be used as a resource for the Bonteheuwel community,” Ms Salie added.Dr Carin-Lee Masters, a clinical psychologist who writes the Help is at Hand column in the Athlone News (See page 11), said TRE is widely known in “healing circles” to effect emotional and physiological shifts in the body and mind through “tremoring” the body.“In my view, TRE has to do with releasing anxious energy stored in the cells of the body and memory related to a traumatic event. According to some researchers, TRE can make significant shifts in somebody who has been through a traumatic experience. Many people attest to this. I would at times, recommend it to patients if they need to do bodywork, but I would not recommend it as a treatment on its own. I strongly believe that a few sessions of bodywork is not enough to be able to process somebody’s traumatic and psychological experiences. To have somebody you trust over time, who supports you in a non-judgemental relationship and holds a space for your thoughts, feelings and fears can be vitally important to an individual’s healing process.” .last_img read more

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NCAA turns up pressure on North Carolina over bathroom law

first_img Published: September 13, 2016 4:52 PM EDT Updated: September 13, 2016 4:53 PM EDT RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – The NCAA’s decision to pull seven championships out of North Carolina ratchets up the pressure on this college sports-crazy state to repeal its law on bathroom use by transgender people.Unlike the recent one-time cancellations by the NBA and various rock stars, the move by college sports’ governing body could make moderate and conservative voters question whether the price tag for the law has finally become too high.Economic development officials said the effect of the NCAA’s action goes well beyond the $20 million the canceled 2016-17 basketball, baseball, soccer, tennis, lacrosse and golf events were expected to bring.“College sports is part of the fabric of North Carolina. It’s part of the culture. I can say with confidence that there’s no other state in the country that loves its college sports more than North Carolina. That’s why it hits so hard and feels so personal,” said Scott Dupree, executive director of the Greater Raleigh Sports Alliance, which was coordinating four of the events being moved.The law passed in March requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and other public places that correspond to the gender on their birth certificate. It also excludes gender identity and sexual orientation from statewide antidiscrimination protections.The Obama administration is suing the state over the measure, calling it discriminatory. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and GOP leaders are defending it as a means of protecting people’s privacy and safety.On Tuesday, Democratic lawmakers urged McCrory and leaders of the GOP-controlled legislature to call the General Assembly into special session to repeal the law.“This General Assembly and its extremist leadership are playing with people’s livelihoods and the well-being of communities all across our state,” said Sen. Mike Woodard of Durham.But with eight weeks to go before Election Day, legislators in campaign mode and no regularly scheduled session until January, the chances are slim the Republicans will act. The GOP leaders are committed to costly court fights over the law and contend that passing the measure was the right thing to do. The GOP has veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature.GOP House Speaker Tim Moore didn’t respond to messages seeking comment, and the office of Republican Senate leader Phil Berger said he was traveling and unavailable. McCrory, who is locked in a tight race for re-election, didn’t reply to emails.Michael Bitzer, a political scientist at Catawba College, said it will be hard for moderate voters who are passionate about sports to ignore the law’s repercussions.“The blowback may be building up even more with this decision,” he said.Mac McCorkle, a Duke University professor and former Democratic consultant, said the NCAA’s announcement reinforces the idea that McCrory has allowed the situation to get out of control.“Put aside the liberal and conservative arguments about the pros and cons,” McCorkle said. “It’s a mess. It’s a continuing mess and governors are held responsible for messes.”McCorkle said the removal of men’s basketball tournament games from Greensboro hits hard because college basketball is the “civil religion” in the state that’s home to UNC, Duke, N.C. State and Wake Forest.The Greensboro area was expected to receive a $14.5 million infusion from the tournament games, as well as $1.6 million from the soccer championships in December that are being moved, said Henri Fourrier, CEO of the Greensboro Area Convention & Visitors Bureau. The four soccer, baseball, lacrosse and tennis events being removed from Cary will deprive the area of about $2 million, Dupree said.Greensboro, Cary, Raleigh and other North Carolina cities are seeking to host scores of other NCAA events over the next six years that could be worth tens of millions of dollars.The NCAA hasn’t decided what to do about any North Carolina events beyond the current academic year. But NCAA president Mark Emmert said Tuesday: “It would have been impossible to conduct championship events in the state with that law in place that lived up to the values and expectations of the member universities and colleges.”The Atlantic Coast Conference, which has its football championship scheduled for December in Charlotte, could be next to act. The championship game, held in Charlotte since 2010, is the last marquee college sporting event left in North Carolina during the 2016-17 season.The conference has a regularly scheduled meeting this week in South Carolina, and ACC Commissioner John Swofford said the bathroom law is on the agenda. Swofford said in a statement Monday night: “It’s time for this bill to be repealed as it’s counter to basic human rights.”Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, a Christian conservative and strong defender of the law, called the NCAA’s decision “extortion.”Previously, musicians including Bruce Springsteen and Pearl Jam canceled concerts, while the NBA decided to move next year’s All-Star Game out of Charlotte. The game was expected to generate $100 million.“Everybody should be concerned about lost revenue, but I don’t put a price tag on our women and girls of any kind,” Forest said. “It’s extortion and it’s shameful extortion. It’s just unbelievable to me to think that these entities would think that it’s OK to invade the privacy or security of a woman or a girl in a shower or a locker room.”Brandon Smith, who works in risk management for a Charlotte-based bank, said he was against the law when it passed. “Once the financial aspect is taken into account, the state will change its stance,” he said. “It’s a matter of time.” Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. SHAREcenter_img NCAA turns up pressure on North Carolina over bathroom law Author: Associated Press last_img read more

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Happy with McNally

first_img Obiter wonders. A regular survey by the website libdemvoice.org seems to show the star of justice minister and peer Tom McNally (pictured), who steered the legal aid bill through the Lords (a somewhat chequered performance at the dispatch box, Obiter, recalls), to be on the rise. The survey asks members to score their satisfaction with senior Lib Dems’ performance. Of the 500 respondents in August, just 3% were ‘very dissatisfied’ with Tom’s performance, and 7% were ‘quite’ dissatisfied, giving him a net satisfaction rating of 36%. That is somewhat short of a reassuring half of all members. But it is still up from his 23% standing in June. Hence Obiter’s guess that rank and file didn’t like the legal aid bill, but for some obscure reason have made their peace now the measure is on the statute book. Still, 44% had ‘no opinion’ – something to build on for Tom’s opponents. Or maybe members, with time to reflect, just blamed deputy PM Nick Clegg – his net satisfaction was somewhere behind on 21%. Did the fight to protect legal aid from the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act get under the skin of Liberal Democrat rank and file? Or are the party’s activists just quick to forgive? last_img read more

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News focus: what now for the council of European bars?

first_imgRefugees, the future of the profession and confidentiality of information are on the radar of the CCBE’s new British president – but does the organisation need a name change?,Europe’s largest lawyers association is experiencing a bit of an identity crisis. ‘By the time you’ve explained to someone what CCBE means you’ve lost them already,’ says Ruthven Gemmell, the Scottish and England and Wales-qualified solicitor who last week took up presidency of the body.One of Gemmell’s ambitions for his term is to start the process of changing the organisation’s name – a French acronym for the council of European bar associations – to something which at least includes the term ‘law’ or ‘lawyers’ in either English or French.Gemmell is not the first to spot the problem. His French predecessor Michel Benichou said last month that his one regret of his term in office was not starting the debate. But he may have to tread carefully. Gemmell is the first UK solicitor to hold the presidency since the CCBE was formed in 1960 (though one barrister and two Scottish advocates have also been there). His term will coincide with the UK triggering article 50 of the EU Treaty.The CCBE is not an EU institution; it describes its role as liaising between member associations and European institutions and others. Its membership of 32 full, three associate and 10 observer countries stretches far beyond the EU. The Law Society, represented by past-president Nick Fluck, is a member through a UK delegation of six bars and law societies. However, the Brussels-based body shows signs of what Eurosceptics call institutional capture – the 12-star EU flag decorated the top table at last month’s plenary session, for example.In his address following his unanimous election, Gemmell went out of his way to stress: ‘I am a European, I respect all the European institutions and courts and above all I am committed to the CCBE.’The plenary session, one of two held annually, offered a glimpse of the challenges involved in reaching common positions across so many jurisdictions based on two distinct legal codes. In a debate over the execution of cross-border decisions involving child custody, a split emerged over whether it is necessary to define the term ‘habitual residence’, with the common law jurisdictions seeing no need.Perhaps a more significant (though amicably resolved) controversy emerged over the adoption of ‘basic principles’ drafted by the Union Internationale des Avocats on the status of refugees. The so-called ‘Budapest principles’ lay out a daunting set of duties for bar associations and professional organisations, including ‘to actively participate in political debates on legislative initiatives concerning the status of refugees and asylum-seekers’.Several delegations, including Austria, Ireland and the Netherlands, said that committing themselves to such a political role would be outside their powers and indeed unlawful. Others, including Greece and Poland, argued that the contested article only requires bar associations to ‘make efforts’.The UK’s position was that bar associations might be put under obligations they may not be able to fulfil – but with the pragmatic suggestion that the different translations might carry different nuances. The proposal to adopt the basic principles was carried, with Germany and the UK abstaining.A stronger consensus emerged when the conference turned to the CCBE’s front-line work, including a scheme offering legal assistance to refugees on the Greek island of Lesvos. Over the past six months, some 27 lawyers, on three-week shifts, have provided free first-instance advice on asylum interviews.Philip Worthington, the English solicitor coordinating European Lawyers in Lesvos, described the difficult conditions faced by volunteer lawyers in the Moria Reception and Identification Centre: ‘The volunteers have all worked extremely hard, often 14-hour days, seven-day weeks… when other organisations are at home for the weekend, we are at work.’ More than 550 individuals have been helped. ‘People who approach us know next to nothing about the asylum process,’ he said. ‘We sit with people and advise them how to present their case. It’s first instance preparation of the sort they would have at home. Without it, people go into their interviews with no idea of what the interview is about and can say things that fatally undermine their case. People who have a good case are being rejected because they don’t have access to legal advice.’Gemmell said that continuing the Lesvos project will be one of three aims of his presidency. ‘With the financial and manpower support of so many bars and law societies which will continue until at least June, we must continue to support this in any ways we can,’ he said.A second priority is what he called ‘the continuing issue of the future of the legal profession which continues to be debated’. No doubt with an eye to his home country, he pointed out the tendency of governments, consumer organisations and competition authorities to ‘look only at the consumer interest rather than the public interest and so see things in purely economic terms, which all too often becomes an obsession with the price of legal services and little else.‘If the provision of legal services is left to market forces alone then they may not be provided at all. The public interest is much wider and requires the availability of legal services and so we must continue to fight for true access to justice.’His third big issue is the confidentiality of information, particularly in light of the EU General Data Protection Regulation.As for the organisation’s name: ‘The presidency has talked for many years of the advantages of the CCBE having a name which is more readily recognisable with what it does. If the name itself is not changed we need to have a simpler but recognisable means of expressing what we do. Whereas I am, by nature, reticent about organisations changing their names, it is a matter worthy of discussion.’  Whether the necessary consensus to make the change can be found in the year of Gemmell’s presidency remains to be seen. ‘The thing about CCBE is it’s Europe in miniature,’ he told the Gazette. Despite his insistence that ‘I’m not there for the UK, I’m there for the CCBE’, bigger questions about Europe are likely to intrude.For information on the European Lawyers in Lesvos project see the websitelast_img read more

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